Indian

Tandoori Rotis (Indian Flat Bread)

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Now that you’re all set to whip up some chana masala next time you’re looking for a quick, nutritious meal you need something to serve it with, right? Enter tandoori rotis.
Crispy on the outside and soft and chewy on the inside, these breads are perfect for sopping up curries and sauces. No yeast means they’re quick to make (no long rise times required) and the ingredient list couldn’t be simpler — you probably have everything you need to make them in your cabinet right now.
Tandoori rotis are traditionally baked in a clay oven called a tandoor, but they can also be made successfully in a regular oven. Just like with pita bread, rotis puff up when the moisture in the dough turns to steam. Because of this, you’ll want to be sure your oven is nice and hot — allow plenty of time for it to preheat. I like to bake mine on a pizza stone, but a heavy duty baking sheet will work just as well. I also like to use a combination of white, whole wheat, and garbanzo beans flours in my rotis because it keeps them nice and light while giving them a great nutty flavor. If you prefer, they can also be made with all whole wheat flour or with a mixture of half white and half whole wheat.
Ready to take your bread making skills to the next level? Try my pea & herb stuffed naan.
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Click to continue reading and get the recipe for Tandoori Rotis –>

Chana Saag (Chickpeas with Spinach)

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Following a month of eating mostly take-out and a trip to the Foodbuzz Festival (where I ate pretty much everything in sight) I’m excited to be back in the kitchen, cooking up healthy recipes.

Choosing the first meal to cook was a difficult task: I was sick of carbs, tired of cheese (yes, it’s possible!), and had my fill of meat. Soup seemed like the perfect solution, but Shawn was sick of that. I knew I was on to something when I spotted a can of chickpeas in the back of the cabinet — starchy, but not heavy like pasta, potatoes, or rice. It didn’t take long to figure out what I wanted to do with them. This chana saag was exactly the kind of meal that I was aching for: warm, creamy chickpeas coated in a fragrant spinach sauce provided enough protein and fiber to keep me satisfied without leaving me stuffed.

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I hadn’t made chana saag in years, and I had forgotten how easy it is! Start to finish, it will take you about a half hour and most of the ingredients involved are pantry staples, meaning this can be easily whipped up on a weeknight. A food processor makes pureeing the spinach sauce a breeze, but if you don’t have one it can also be made successfully in a blender.

Looking for a vegan meal? Substitute silken tofu for the yogurt! You can also leave it out entirely, but it does add a nice touch of creaminess to the sauce.

Looking for a meat-filled meal? I encourage you to give the chickpeas a try. But if you insist, you can substitute two chicken breasts for the chickpeas. Just adjust the final cooking time to ensure that it’s cooked through.

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Click to continue reading and get the recipe for Chana Saag –>

Meat Free Friday: Chana Masala (Curried Chickpeas)

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There’s an Indian restaurant around the corner from my house. In addition to having great food, they’re one of the few Indian restaurants in town that have a weekend lunch buffet — and sometimes they even have a coupon for buy one, get one free! Needless to say, we find ourselves there on Saturdays fairly often. All of the options are spectacular, but I always head straight for the chickpeas. They do them a few different way, but whenever I see “the one with the onions” I know I’ve hit the jackpot. This dish is glorious: hearty but not heavy and with the perfect amount of spice to make it noticeably hot without being too much. And the chickpeas — oh, the chickpeas. I’m always jealous of how they get their chickpeas to be so silky smooth.

So, me being me, I decided to try reproducing it at home.

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I searched for a while, but wasn’t able to figure out what exactly this dish is called. So I used a combination of recipes and memory to come up with this recipe. I’m calling it chana masala, which from what I can tell is a broad description that translates to something like “chickpeas in curry sauce.” It isn’t exactly the same as the restaurant’s, but it’s delicious nonetheless. Caramelized onions and tomatoes give the dish a great depth of flavor, and a combination of spices and cream give it a luxurious earthiness.

The trick to getting those velvety chickpeas is to start with dried beans. I have nothing against canned chickpeas. In fact, I use them all the time. But when you really think about the texture of them, they have sort of a grittiness or a sandiness to them. Dried beans take a lot longer to prepare, but the texture is entirely different — they’re soft and plump, with a smooth, creamy center that doesn’t have a trace of grittiness to it. I’ve tried making dried chickpeas a few times before but they’ve never come out quite right. You need to be patient with them. Soak them overnight in lots of water — they’ll plump up to at least double their original size. Then, simmer then slowly for at least an hour until they are tender and creamy.

If you’re in a rush, you can use canned chickpeas and have a delicious dinner in a few minutes. But if you have the time and patience to start with dried beans, you’ll be in for a real treat.

You may find chickpeas being sold under their other name — garbanzo beans.

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Meat-Free Monday: Daring Cooks Indian Dosas

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I was very excited to learn that the Daring Cooks challenge for September had an Indian theme! I love Indian food, but I havn’t posted many Indian recipes. I also haven’t eaten it in a while, so it was a nice treat! I had actually never had dosas before, but these were fabulous and I’ll definitely be making them again! It also wasn’t difficult to make – this took me a total of about an hour, most of which was spent on prep. [….}